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Regions

I recently tried playing a DVD on my somewhat new laptop to no avail. Was the first time since I got this laptop that I even tried. Hell, the shitdows8 install that was on here when I bought the laptop was never even booted into. I had installed Arch on it as soon as I took it out of the box. So, I actually didn't even know if it worked at all, maybe I got a bad one and never realized it. I double checked that the libdvdcss, libdvdread, libdvdnav stuff was installed, tried the -git versions of each out of the AUR. Noting was working for me. VLC complained that it couldn't break the encryption, mplayer would only play the FBI warning at the beginning of any disk that I tried. I scoured the Arch wiki and forums. Eventually, I came across this mplayer page that held the key for my issue. So, off to the AUR I went to build the articles suggested regionset tool to hopefully fix my issue. Seems that there wasn't a region code set at all on the drive. After setting the region code to 1 (for North America), VLC, mpl…

PumpIO in the AUR

I have added a package for pump.io to the AUR: link. Hopefully, if someone attempts to use it, it actually works. At the time of this writing, I've been using Arch for about 2 years. During this time, I've downloaded and edited PKGBUILD's from the AUR quite a few times. Until recently, I haven't actually maintained any public PKGBUILD's. Time for that to change. I wrote the PKGBUILD from scratch, using a few others as a guide, along with the Arch wiki entry and my pump.io setup. Installing pump.io from the AUR will install it to /usr/share/webapps/pumpio, place a sample config file at /etc/webapps/pumpio/pump.io.json and a systemd file at /usr/lib/systemd/system/pumpio.service. The AUR package will install the node dependecies (along with databank-mongodb and databank-redis as they seem to be the most popular databank backends currently). With the sample config that is installed, you should be able to run a testing pump.io instance as soon as it's installed. Here would be me installing it and running it.…

Simple Nodejs Express Server

Just for fun (and because I mentioned to @jonkulp that I would), here is a quick (plus slightly extended) write up on how to spin up a simple nodejs server with express.js. First, install nodejs and npm, it's bundled together in ArchLinux, not sure about other distros. In Debian, it looks like they are split. Also, in Debian, they have decided to rename the node executable to nodejs, which breaks some things. This is due to a package for a Ham Radio program being called node. If you don't have this node installed, you can "fix" nodejs by creating a symlink. $ sudo ln -s /usr/bin/nodejs /usr/bin/node At the time of this writing, here are the versions that I have installed: $ node -v v0.10.22 $ npm -v 1.3.14 Once these are installed, we'll install express globally with: $ sudo npm install -g express Next we need a directory where you would like to run the server so, create a directory where ever and navigate into it. $ mkdir express_server $ cd express_server Express has a built in function to set things up for…

KDE on my Eee

The second stop of my DE/WM hopping found me with KDE on my EeePC as previously stated. The only other time I've actually run KDE installed was for about five minutes before I realized that it just wasn't going to run on my netbook. I can't quite remember when that was but, it had to have been nearly 2.5 years ago. So when I decided to give it a spin this time, I expected much the same. I was extremely surprised to find that not only did it run, it has run quite well on this little box. It's run so well that I may have to come back to KDE on here after all of the hopping is done. I started with another clean install of Arch so that there wouldn't be any conflicting configs laying around from my previous Gnome3 install. And then, I just took the lazy way out and installed the full KDE group. This followed much the same path as I did with the Gnome3 install, providing me with the full KDE experience. After the install and initial configuration, I had the base, base-devel and kde groups installed out of the ma…

DE-WM Hopping

As I stated in my last post, I started doing some Desktop Environment/Window Manager hopping. This started as an urge to do some distro hopping but, seeing that I feel quite at home with Arch, I figured that all I really just wanted to see some other DE and/or WM's. Most everything I'll need will be available in the official Arch repo's or the AUR so, there's no real need to do the distro hopping side of it. Plus, I've already got the Arch dual architecture netinstall on a USB drive, might as well give it something to do. I started using Linux with Ubuntu (8.04) until I started looking for a lighter setup. I then found CrunchBang and switched to it for my main distro. About the same time CrunchBang was moving to a Debian base, I was getting quite tired of the Ubuntu base that I'd always been using and started looking at the mothership, Debian. Somewhere in there, I installed Fedora on my EeePC and ran that for some months. Also, I did quite a bit of distro hopping with a spare partition on my EeePC throughout…

Gnome3 Revisit

I've recently revisited Gnome3 on my EeePC. The last time that I had checked it out was not long after it was initially released with Fedora. Now that version 3.4 was out, and I've gotten a distro hopping urge suddenly, I figured that it was time to see how it's coming along. Also, to be honest, it's not really distro hopping that I want to do as much as it is Desktop Environment/Window Manager hopping. I'll be sticking with Arch for all of my upcoming experiments. In the end, I decided that it's still not for me. It's certainly quite a bit more polished than the initial 3.0 release, still needs quite a few extensions to agree with my workflow and still dogs down my EeePC too much. Last time, I left Gnome3 on it for quite some time. This time, I wasn't planning on leaving it on for very long at all. For this install, I simply installed these three groups: base, base-devel and gnome. I also installed a few items from gnome-extra as well as a few of my favorite/needed applications. This setup could easily be li…

StatusNet - ArchLinux rc.d scripts

This is a quick post to put my rc.d scripts that I use for my StatusNet instances. Both of these scripts, one for micro.jpope.org and the other for matrix.jpope.org, have been working great for me for the past few months. I also have Monit monitoring the daemons and restarting them as necessary via these scripts. My micro instance has four daemons running: queuedaemon, imdaemon, twitterstatusfetcher and synctwitterfriends for the queue, XMPP and the Twitterbridge. The init script for it has a each of these listed just so that I can easily check the status of them. The matrix script only has one daemon, queuedaemon, as that instance is setup much lighter than my main instance. If someone is looking for a quick and simple script, the matrix one will probably be the better choice to start with. Both scripts are pretty much the same aside for the extra few lines to capture the pid's of the extra daemons running For both of these scripts, there are the main config settings at the beginning for StatusNet install p…

Firefox Sync on Arch

As part of my desire to reduce my usage of third parties concerning my online data, I've always wanted to get my own sync server going for Firefox. I had tried this a few different times and had been unsuccessful each time until today. I've mostly been wanting to have one going to further reduce my dependence of third parties in regards to my online data. Of course, this has been mostly been directed at Google but I have extended it to Dropbox and now Mozilla. I don't really have any reasons to dis-trust Mozilla but, the Degooglify attitude shouldn't stop with just Google. If you have the option of fully taking control of your data, I feel that you should. ;) So, looking at starting a FF Sync Server leads to this documentation that Mozilla has. After reading over it again, I realized that the dev setup is very similar to the basic setup of MediaGoblin that I currently have running here. My MediaGoblin setup is using a python server, running on a port which is then redirected to the sub-domain in the Apache…

MediaGoblin - ArchLinux rc.d scripts

I recently moved my MediaGoblin instance from an Amazon EC2 instance (Debian, Nginx) to my server at home, which runs ArchLinux and Apache. After getting my data moved home and the instance up and running, I really needed to create some init scripts. For a bit, I was being lazy and running the separate server pieces in tabs in screen. Which works fine until you reboot and forget to restart the services. Finally, I got around to writing those scripts. The MediaGoblin built in server setup consists of two parts, Python Paste for the basic http serving and Celery for the task processing. You can run these parts as a single process or separately. For the best performance, they should be run as separate processes, especially when you upload video, large images and (in the future) audio. Having these processes separate (along with running Paste in CELERY_ALWAYS_EAGER=false mode) will allow uploads to be processed asynchronously. And from experience, having MediaGoblin running synchronously can kinda drag. Of course…